This analysis puts a $0 here, though incorporating labor response and macroeconomic effects is a core next step. Penn-Wharton estimated reduction in work hours of ~6% for the deficit-funded approach, or ~3% for the payroll-tax-funded approach. Given the Yang plan is half-deficit-funded, it’d probably fall somewhere in between, but would depend on economic assumptions like labor elasticity and capital response to deficits.

--

Co-founder & CEO of PolicyEngine. Founder & president of the UBI Center. Economist. Alum of UC Berkeley & MIT. YIMBY. CCLer. Former Google data scientist.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Max Ghenis

Max Ghenis

Co-founder & CEO of PolicyEngine. Founder & president of the UBI Center. Economist. Alum of UC Berkeley & MIT. YIMBY. CCLer. Former Google data scientist.